Parallel Sessions - Approaches to Modeling 3
           
Event Type Start Time End Time Rm # Chair  

 

Education 1:30PM 3:00PM 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
 
Title:

Approaches to Modeling
  Speakers/Presenter:

 

Education 1:30PM 3:00PM 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
 
Title:

Cluster Computing: Beginner's Message Passing Interface
  Speakers/Presenter:
Paul Gray, David Joiner

 

Education 1:30PM 3:00PM 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
 
Title:

Mathematics on the Web
  Speakers/Presenter:
Bebo White

 

Education 1:30PM 3:00PM 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
 
Title:

T2K (Text to Knowledge)
  Speakers/Presenter:
Michael Welge, Loretta Auvil, Peter Bajscy
             

 

     
  Session: Parallel Sessions - Approaches to Modeling 3
  Title: Approaches to Modeling
  Chair:
  Time: Sunday, November 16, 1:30PM - 3:00PM
  Rm #: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
 
   
  Description:
  Civic Center Rooms [to be assigned]

* Agent Modeling Michael Novak, Lisa Bievenue, Edna Gentry (repeat of 8:30 AM session)
* Systems Dynamics Modeling Shawn Sendlinger, Susan Ragan (repeat of 8:30 AM session)
* Algebraic Modeling Garrett Love, Dan Warner (repeat of 8:30 AM session)
* Visualization Steve Cunningham
* T2K (Text to Knowledge) Michael Welge, Loretta Auvil, Peter Bajscy
* Cluster Computing: Beginner's Message Passing Interface Paul Gray, David Joiner
* Mathematics on the Web - Bebo White
  Link: --
   

 

     
  Session: Parallel Sessions - Approaches to Modeling 3
  Title: Cluster Computing: Beginner's Message Passing Interface
  Chair:
  Time: Sunday, November 16, 1:30PM - 3:00PM
  Rm #: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
  Paul Gray, David Joiner
   
  Description:
  An introduction to creating, compiling, and running parallel programs using Message Passing Interface (MPI). This presentation will introduce the most commonly used MPI commands with "Hello World" style examples in C/C++ and Fortran. Some programming experience and familiarity with Unix-based systems recommended.
  Link: --
   

 

     
  Session: Parallel Sessions - Approaches to Modeling 3
  Title: Mathematics on the Web
  Chair:
  Time: Sunday, November 16, 1:30PM - 3:00PM
  Rm #: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
  Bebo White
   
  Description:
  The World Wide Web was invented by scientists in order to share scientific information. Such information is often dependent upon visually acceptable mathematical expressions and formulae. Until very recently, the mathematics in web pages was frequently encoded as a graphical image (in GIF, JPEG, or PNG formats). Such images are often of poor quality and visually different from the text that encloses them. They are also, by definition, static meaning that the viewer of the page cannot interact with them. With MathML, this situation is changing.

MathML, short for Mathematical Markup Language, is a World Wide Web Consortium Recommendation for encoding mathematical content in web pages. MathML is an XML application thereby making it a logical counterpart to HTML (or XHTML), the markup system for which most web content is encoded. It could therefore be said that MathML is to mathematical content what HTML (or XHTML) is to textual content.

MathML includes elements and attributes for encoding both the presentation and content of mathematics. In very general terms, presentation elements enable math to be rendered sensibly, while content elements encode the meaning of the math sufficiently to allow computational systems to interact with it.

The benefits and application of MathML is web-based science education content are obvious. Attendees to this tutorial will leave with:
* A comprehensive overview of the elements of MathML markup;
* A portfolio of MathML examples and templates that can be used immediately;
* A resource list of available MathML viewers/plug-ins, editors, and development systems.
  Link: --
   

 

     
  Session: Parallel Sessions - Approaches to Modeling 3
  Title: T2K (Text to Knowledge)
  Chair:
  Time: Sunday, November 16, 1:30PM - 3:00PM
  Rm #: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
  Michael Welge, Loretta Auvil, Peter Bajscy
   
  Description:
  Text mining is the process of analyzing text to extract information that is useful for particular purposes. In text mining, identifying key phrases to use for classification is important. We have implemented a semantic parser that extracts nouns, noun phrases, verbs, and/or verb phrases. Documents are then encoded by counting the occurrence of the selected phrases. The documents can then be clustered or classified. Visualizations have also been developed to allow interactive analysis of the documents that have been clustered.

This session will provide an overview of text mining, illustrate how text mining is done using D2K and give attendees a chance to use the T2K tool.
  Link: --