New Technology II
           
Event Type Start Time End Time Rm # Chair  

 

Masterworks 3:30PM 4:15PM 16-18 John Sopka (Sun Microsystems Inc.)
 
Title:

Molecular Electronics: Vision and Status
  Speakers/Presenter:
Stan Williams (Hewlett-Packard Laboratories)

 

Masterworks 4:15PM 5:00PM 16-18 John Sopka (Sun Microsystems Inc.)
 
Title:

Nanoscale Electronics for Future Computing
  Speakers/Presenter:
Raymond Tsui (Fellow of the Technical Staff, Motorola Labs)
             

 

     
  Session: New Technology II
  Title: Molecular Electronics: Vision and Status
  Chair: John Sopka (Sun Microsystems Inc.)
  Time: Wednesday, November 19, 3:30PM - 4:15PM
  Rm #: 16-18
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
  Stan Williams (Hewlett-Packard Laboratories)
   
  Description:
  The ultimate size of a device in an electronic circuit will be about a nanometer, roughly the size of a molecule. Thus, the idea of using molecules as active devices in circuits has intrigued researchers for the past 30 years. However, before molecular electronics can become a reality, there are several major issues to resolve. Can one architect a system that can work perfectly even though there will inevitably be defective components in the circuit (defect tolerance)? Can one make electrical connections to molecules without destroying them and their electronic properties? What is the physical basis that would determine the operation of a molecular device? This talk will provide at least partial answers to these questions.
  Link: --
   

 

     
  Session: New Technology II
  Title: Nanoscale Electronics for Future Computing
  Chair: John Sopka (Sun Microsystems Inc.)
  Time: Wednesday, November 19, 4:15PM - 5:00PM
  Rm #: 16-18
  Speaker(s)/Author(s):  
  Raymond Tsui (Fellow of the Technical Staff, Motorola Labs)
   
  Description:
  Molecules are highly uniform and inherently nanoscale, which could be very advantageous for the fabrication of ultra-dense, low-power ICs. Furthermore, they can be synthesized with unique chemical, physical and biological properties that could be used to facilitate self-assembly to one another and to specific surfaces, and to form elements that can perform information processing. In the last few years, a wide variety of molecules have been studied as candidates and significant research advances have been made. Custom-synthesized molecules have exhibited useful electronic functions such as switching and memory. Carbon nanotubes, a form of molecular carbon with a diameter as small as 1 nm, have shown excellent transistor-like properties. Meanwhile, others have used the molecular recognition properties of DNA to facilitate the self-assembly of nanoscale structures. Some of these advances will be described. However, while these molecules provide unique features, each has its own individual technical challenges too. And interfacing with the micro-/macro-scale worlds will also be a key issue. So, while molecular electronics hold tremendous promise as a method to extend beyond conventional scaling, much interdisciplinary research still remains in order to realize its full potential.
  Link: --